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Asian Arts Council 2015-2016 General Meeting Lectures

Each month the Asian Arts Council presents a program featuring a distinguished scholar, curator, collector or Asian arts enthusiast of note. We meet the last Thursday of the month in the Museum’s Boardroom at 1:00 p.m. and begin with a brief business meeting before the lecture. Meetings are free for AAC members, only $10 for Museum members, $12 for non-members and $8 for students.

General Meeting Lecture Calendar - Printable flyer
Archived lecture schedules
 

Click on a date line below for the summary of the lecture from the Asian Arts Council Newsletter

Jun. 25 - 1:00 p.m. with pictures Silk, Spices, and Shipwrecks: China in 17th Century Dutch Art Hilda Yoder, Ph.D., Docent

AAC Newsletter – July 2015, p 2-3, Editor: Marilyn Adams    Lecture Flyer

hereHilda Yoder, Ph.D., San Diego Museum of Art Docent, presented an informative and stimulating lecture on Silk, Spices, and Shipwrecks: China in 17th Century Dutch Art. Exotic luxury objects, especially blue and white porcelain made in Jingdezhen, China during the reign of the Emperor Wanli, influenced 17th century Dutch art and culture profoundly. Beginning in 1602 with a sensational capture of the Portuguese ship St. Iago, filled with porcelain, and in 1604 with the auction of about 100,000 pieces of Wanli porcelain captured from the Portuguese ship St. Catharina, most ordinary Dutch 17th centuryChinese bowl with fruit families could proudly exhibit porcelain plates, bowls, fruit dishes and butter dishes—objects associated with wealth and nobility in the rest of Europe. Between 1602 and 1650, more than 3 million pieces of Chinese porcelain were transported in huge warships by the Dutch East Indies Company to the Dutch Republic. Since little was written at that time about this Dutch obsession with China’s porcelain, we have to rely on 17th century Dutch paintings—portraits, genre scenes, and especially still lifes—to provide evidence of this mania for Asia’s riches and wonders. 

When remnants of East Indies Company ship, The White Lion, shipwrecked in 1613, were discovered in 1976, 290 pieces of blue and white Wanli porcelain still in pristine condition were brought to the surface. Now in the Rijksmuseum, these dishes—made before 1613, in Jingdezhen—have become reference points in the study of what is labeled Kraak porcelain, named after the type of Portuguese ship, carracks, that had first introduced this porcelain to the Dutch Republic. Kraak porcelain is recognized by Kraak porcelain sketchy but well painted designs, with alternating wide and narrow panels filled with Daoist symbols and flowers, and by centers filled with auspicious nature scenes. The known dates of these porcelains confirm the remarkably precise depiction of the Chinese porcelains in 17th century Dutch paintings. With the new middle-class craze for these exotic blue and white dishes, Dutch potters soon created imitation Chinese ceramic-ware and called it “porcelain.” 

When China descended into chaos during the 1640’s and the export of Chinese porcelain halted, the Delft potters intensified their production to satisfy the demand. By 1660 one fourth of the population of Delft depended directly or indirectly on the ceramic industry, and the city had become Europe’s center of imitation Chinese blue and white ceramics, now called Delftware.  The Daoist symbols that made no sense to the Delft potters were altered into abstracted flowers or lively scribbles; the auspicious center scenes were filled with Dutch flowers, landscapes, even Madonna’s—mostly painted with a loose, spontaneous brush stroke and always surrounded by distinctively Chinese, exotic-looking broad and narrow panels. Taking advantage of the fashion for blue and white ceramic objects in Dutch homes, the potters created cheerful blue and white wall tiles, decorating them with an endless variety of everyday subjects--children, soldiers, sail boats, flowers and landscapes.

           Tile - water carrier 1928.36.4Tile - ship 2007.31
1928.36.10.4           2007.31

 

The Dutch mania for Chinese blue and white porcelain had led to the creation of a completely new genre:  blue and white wall tiles that would become an iconic, quintessentially indigenous Dutch object, one that defines Dutch—not Chinese—identity even today.  The San Diego Museum of Art has in its collection over 350 17th century Delftware wall tiles, a rare Kraak flask, and a blue and white 17th century Delftware plate.

Jingdezhen vase 1995.131       Delftware L3959
Jingdezhen             Delftware Plate, 17th C.   
Vase,                           L3959           
1573-1619                                                  
1995.131                                                

These objects can be considered visual metaphors of the radical, historic, worldwide changes due to the early 17th century global trade.

Jul. 30 - 1:00 p.m. Textiles for the Head: Utility, Identity, Authority Christine Brown, Collector & Traveler

New website feature! A summary of Christine Brown's lecture will be here soon after the newsletter comes out!

Aug.27 - 1:00 p.m. Gale, Hill, Clark, Burke: Treasures of Japanese Art at the Minneapolis Institute of Arts Andreas Marks, Ph.D., Mary Griggs Burke Curator of Japanese and Korean Art and Director of the Clark Center for Japanese Art at the Minneapolis Institute of Arts

Andreas Marks Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. In vitae ex dui. Vestibulum vel lacinia mauris. Integer quis fermentum nisl. Mauris a luctus quam, a commodo risus. Donec tincidunt ipsum a dolor varius vestibulum. Proin lacinia, urna nec venenatis congue, turpis nibh consectetur eros, nec facilisis metus mi at sem. Duis at nibh tellus. Curabitur ac vehicula ante. Vestibulum mollis scelerisque dui id lacinia. Maecenas dignissim, urna nec posuere elementum, eros elit ornare odio, sed ullamcorper sem ipsum a ex. Quisque tempor turpis ut ligula condimentum, eu tristique orci tempus. Fusce at imperdiet elit. In ut risus quis nunc aliquet pulvinar eget eu tortor. Praesent tortor erat, ullamcorper non efficitur vitae, ullamcorper sit amet metus. Fusce maximus mollis placerat. Vestibulum in elementum sem, et porttitor sem. Morbi hendrerit risus non diam tincidunt, nec dapibus ex lacinia. Nam mauris arcu, hendrerit vitae dui id, porttitor feugiat nulla. Nulla in congue libero, quis luctus ipsum. Cras dapibus faucibus purus, imperdiet condimentum lacus ullamcorper sed. Praesent vitae odio nunc. Suspendisse potenti. Mauris ex urna, blandit sit amet pharetra vel, euismod vel orci. In luctus, erat eget lobortis eleifend, mauris felis sodales dui, nec ultrices sapien metus non dolor. Sed feugiat et est eu dapibus. Quisque fermentum placerat enim in convallis. Maecenas ac nunc mollis, vehicula sem et, faucibus tortor. Sed finibus nibh erat, at vehicula ex dapibus et. Donec vel fringilla neque, sit amet luctus ante. Nam in magna ante. Etiam gravida sollicitudin ante eget vulputate. Aenean in hendrerit neque. Pellentesque id condimentum odio. Nunc augue arcu, sodales a risus eu, gravida tristique lectus. Morbi a ipsum dictum, accumsan libero quis, rhoncus diam. Donec efficitur placerat leo, laoreet sodales neque euismod in. Phasellus sodales eleifend sem. Phasellus lobortis convallis sapien in laoreet. Nulla sagittis nisl id posuere molestie. Nam non tortor quam. Sed non pellentesque urna. In at leo ultricies, laoreet ipsum a, ornare libero. Nullam pharetra mauris at sem pretium volutpat. Nunc cursus at quam et hendrerit. Sed ullamcorper, purus eget porttitor semper, libero est sollicitudin quam, nec semper mauris nunc non nisl. Sed fermentum lobortis sodales. Phasellus vitae luctus ante, id ultricies mauris. Maecenas sed viverra sem. Duis tempor felis arcu, ut posuere diam sollicitudin et. Donec id lorem scelerisque, fringilla neque et, ullamcorper nunc. Nullam congue, sem interdum gravida varius, nisi est sagittis lacus, quis ultrices lacus eros et mauris. Nullam egestas lacinia feugiat.

Sep. 24 - 1:00 p.m. Mysterious Moon Myths: Behind the Chinese Moon Festival Alex Stewart, Ph.D., Senior Coordinator of Education and Exhibits, San Diego Chinese Historical Museum; Lecturer, Department of Anthropology, UCSD

Alex Stewart, Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. In vitae ex dui. Vestibulum vel lacinia mauris. Integer quis fermentum nisl. Mauris a luctus quam, a commodo risus. Donec tincidunt ipsum a dolor varius vestibulum. Proin lacinia, urna nec venenatis congue, turpis nibh consectetur eros, nec facilisis metus mi at sem. Duis at nibh tellus. Curabitur ac vehicula ante. Vestibulum mollis scelerisque dui id lacinia. Maecenas dignissim, urna nec posuere elementum, eros elit ornare odio, sed ullamcorper sem ipsum a ex. Quisque tempor turpis ut ligula condimentum, eu tristique orci tempus. Fusce at imperdiet elit. In ut risus quis nunc aliquet pulvinar eget eu tortor. Praesent tortor erat, ullamcorper non efficitur vitae, ullamcorper sit amet metus. Fusce maximus mollis placerat. Vestibulum in elementum sem, et porttitor sem. Morbi hendrerit risus non diam tincidunt, nec dapibus ex lacinia. Nam mauris arcu, hendrerit vitae dui id, porttitor feugiat nulla. Nulla in congue libero, quis luctus ipsum. Cras dapibus faucibus purus, imperdiet condimentum lacus ullamcorper sed. Praesent vitae odio nunc. Suspendisse potenti. Mauris ex urna, blandit sit amet pharetra vel, euismod vel orci. In luctus, erat eget lobortis eleifend, mauris felis sodales dui, nec ultrices sapien metus non dolor. Sed feugiat et est eu dapibus. Quisque fermentum placerat enim in convallis. Maecenas ac nunc mollis, vehicula sem et, faucibus tortor. Sed finibus nibh erat, at vehicula ex dapibus et. Donec vel fringilla neque, sit amet luctus ante. Nam in magna ante. Etiam gravida sollicitudin ante eget vulputate. Aenean in hendrerit neque. Pellentesque id condimentum odio. Nunc augue arcu, sodales a risus eu, gravida tristique lectus. Morbi a ipsum dictum, accumsan libero quis, rhoncus diam. Donec efficitur placerat leo, laoreet sodales neque euismod in. Phasellus sodales eleifend sem. Phasellus lobortis convallis sapien in laoreet. Nulla sagittis nisl id posuere molestie. Nam non tortor quam. Sed non pellentesque urna. In at leo ultricies, laoreet ipsum a, ornare libero. Nullam pharetra mauris at sem pretium volutpat. Nunc cursus at quam et hendrerit. Sed ullamcorper, purus eget porttitor semper, libero est sollicitudin quam, nec semper mauris nunc non nisl. Sed fermentum lobortis sodales. Phasellus vitae luctus ante, id ultricies mauris. Maecenas sed viverra sem. Duis tempor felis arcu, ut posuere diam sollicitudin et. Donec id lorem scelerisque, fringilla neque et, ullamcorper nunc. Nullam congue, sem interdum gravida varius, nisi est sagittis lacus, quis ultrices lacus eros et mauris. Nullam egestas lacinia feugiat.

Oct. 29 - 1:00 p.m. Gagaku: Traditional Music of the Japanese Imperial Court Robert Garfias, Ph.D., Ethnomusicology, Department of Anthropology , UCI

Robert Garfias, Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. In vitae ex dui. Vestibulum vel lacinia mauris. Integer quis fermentum nisl. Mauris a luctus quam, a commodo risus. Donec tincidunt ipsum a dolor varius vestibulum. Proin lacinia, urna nec venenatis congue, turpis nibh consectetur eros, nec facilisis metus mi at sem. Duis at nibh tellus. Curabitur ac vehicula ante. Vestibulum mollis scelerisque dui id lacinia. Maecenas dignissim, urna nec posuere elementum, eros elit ornare odio, sed ullamcorper sem ipsum a ex. Quisque tempor turpis ut ligula condimentum, eu tristique orci tempus. Fusce at imperdiet elit. In ut risus quis nunc aliquet pulvinar eget eu tortor. Praesent tortor erat, ullamcorper non efficitur vitae, ullamcorper sit amet metus. Fusce maximus mollis placerat. Vestibulum in elementum sem, et porttitor sem. Morbi hendrerit risus non diam tincidunt, nec dapibus ex lacinia. Nam mauris arcu, hendrerit vitae dui id, porttitor feugiat nulla. Nulla in congue libero, quis luctus ipsum. Cras dapibus faucibus purus, imperdiet condimentum lacus ullamcorper sed. Praesent vitae odio nunc. Suspendisse potenti. Mauris ex urna, blandit sit amet pharetra vel, euismod vel orci. In luctus, erat eget lobortis eleifend, mauris felis sodales dui, nec ultrices sapien metus non dolor. Sed feugiat et est eu dapibus. Quisque fermentum placerat enim in convallis. Maecenas ac nunc mollis, vehicula sem et, faucibus tortor. Sed finibus nibh erat, at vehicula ex dapibus et. Donec vel fringilla neque, sit amet luctus ante. Nam in magna ante. Etiam gravida sollicitudin ante eget vulputate. Aenean in hendrerit neque. Pellentesque id condimentum odio. Nunc augue arcu, sodales a risus eu, gravida tristique lectus. Morbi a ipsum dictum, accumsan libero quis, rhoncus diam. Donec efficitur placerat leo, laoreet sodales neque euismod in. Phasellus sodales eleifend sem. Phasellus lobortis convallis sapien in laoreet. Nulla sagittis nisl id posuere molestie. Nam non tortor quam. Sed non pellentesque urna. In at leo ultricies, laoreet ipsum a, ornare libero. Nullam pharetra mauris at sem pretium volutpat. Nunc cursus at quam et hendrerit. Sed ullamcorper, purus eget porttitor semper, libero est sollicitudin quam, nec semper mauris nunc non nisl. Sed fermentum lobortis sodales. Phasellus vitae luctus ante, id ultricies mauris. Maecenas sed viverra sem. Duis tempor felis arcu, ut posuere diam sollicitudin et. Donec id lorem scelerisque, fringilla neque et, ullamcorper nunc. Nullam congue, sem interdum gravida varius, nisi est sagittis lacus, quis ultrices lacus eros et mauris. Nullam egestas lacinia feugiat.

Dec. 01 - 11:00 a.m. Heritage Luncheon Korean art specialist, Robert D. Mowry, Ph.D.

Robert D. Mowry: In luctus, erat eget lobortis eleifend, mauris felis sodales dui, nec ultrices sapien metus non dolor. Sed feugiat et est eu dapibus. Quisque fermentum placerat enim in convallis. Maecenas ac nunc mollis, vehicula sem et, faucibus tortor. Sed finibus nibh erat, at vehicula ex dapibus et. Donec vel fringilla neque, sit amet luctus ante. Nam in magna ante. Etiam gravida sollicitudin ante eget vulputate. Aenean in hendrerit neque. Pellentesque id condimentum odio. Nunc augue arcu, sodales a risus eu, gravida tristique lectus. Morbi a ipsum dictum, accumsan libero quis, rhoncus diam. Donec efficitur placerat leo, laoreet sodales neque euismod in. Phasellus sodales eleifend sem. Phasellus lobortis convallis sapien in laoreet. Nulla sagittis nisl id posuere molestie. Nam non tortor quam. Sed non pellentesque urna. In at leo ultricies, laoreet ipsum a, ornare libero. Nullam pharetra mauris at sem pretium volutpat. Nunc cursus at quam et hendrerit. Sed ullamcorper, purus eget porttitor semper, libero est sollicitudin quam, nec semper mauris nunc non nisl. Sed fermentum lobortis sodales. Phasellus vitae luctus ante, id ultricies mauris. Maecenas sed viverra sem. Duis tempor felis arcu, ut posuere diam sollicitudin et. Donec id lorem scelerisque, fringilla neque et, ullamcorper nunc. Nullam congue, sem interdum gravida varius, nisi est sagittis lacus, quis ultrices lacus eros et mauris. Nullam egestas lacinia feugiat.

Jan 28 - 1:00 p.m. Smoking ‘The Rat’ and Saving the Nation: Early 20th Century Chinese Display Advertising and the rise of ‘Commercial Warfare’ David Fraser, Ph.D., Asian Survey, managing editor, UCB

David Fraser, Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. In vitae ex dui. Vestibulum vel lacinia mauris. Integer quis fermentum nisl. Mauris a luctus quam, a commodo risus. Donec tincidunt ipsum a dolor varius vestibulum. Proin lacinia, urna nec venenatis congue, turpis nibh consectetur eros, nec facilisis metus mi at sem. Duis at nibh tellus. Curabitur ac vehicula ante. Vestibulum mollis scelerisque dui id lacinia. Maecenas dignissim, urna nec posuere elementum, eros elit ornare odio, sed ullamcorper sem ipsum a ex. Quisque tempor turpis ut ligula condimentum, eu tristique orci tempus. Fusce at imperdiet elit. In ut risus quis nunc aliquet pulvinar eget eu tortor. Praesent tortor erat, ullamcorper non efficitur vitae, ullamcorper sit amet metus. Fusce maximus mollis placerat. Vestibulum in elementum sem, et porttitor sem. Morbi hendrerit risus non diam tincidunt, nec dapibus ex lacinia. Nam mauris arcu, hendrerit vitae dui id, porttitor feugiat nulla. Nulla in congue libero, quis luctus ipsum. Cras dapibus faucibus purus, imperdiet condimentum lacus ullamcorper sed. Praesent vitae odio nunc. Suspendisse potenti. Mauris ex urna, blandit sit amet pharetra vel, euismod vel orci.

Fall/Wintercalendar collage